1733 SPANISH FLEET SHIPWRECK 4 Reales Silver Cob Coin Sunken Treasure with COA

1733 SPANISH FLEET SHIPWRECK 4 Reales Silver Cob Coin Sunken Treasure with COA
1733 SPANISH FLEET SHIPWRECK 4 Reales Silver Cob Coin Sunken Treasure with COA

1733 SPANISH FLEET SHIPWRECK 4 Reales Silver Cob Coin Sunken Treasure with COA

On Friday, the thirteenth of July 1733, the New Spain Fleet left Havana harbor on its return voyage to Spain. Commanded by Lieutenant-General Rodrigo de Torres aboard the 60-gun navio, El Rubi, the flota consisted of three other armed navios, sixteen merchant naos, and two smaller ships carrying supplies to the Presidio of St. The following day, after the vessels sighted the Florida Keys, the wind shifted abruptly from the east and increased in velocity.

Lieutenant-General Torres, sensing an approaching hurricane, ordered his captains to turn back to Havana and to sail as close to the wind as possible, but it was too late. By nightfall of the fifteenth, all or most of the ships had been driven westward and scattered, sunk, or swamped along eighty miles of the Florida Keys. Four ships made it safely back to Havana. Another vessel, the galleon El Africa, managed to sail on to Spain undamaged.

Survivors gathered in small groups throughout the low islands and built crude shelters from debris that had washed ashore. Spanish admiralty officials in Havana, worried about the fate of the fleet, sent a small sloop to search for wrecks.

Before the sloop could return, another boat arrived in the harbor and reported seeing many large ships grounded near a place called Head of the Martyrs. Immediately, nine rescue vessels loaded with supplies, food, divers, and salvage equipment sailed for the scene of the disaster. Soldiers were on board to protect the shore camps and the recovered cargo. Richard Boileau has metal detected these shipwrecks "listening for the beating of a dead man's heart" for nearly 50 years and has found many treasures and amazing artifacts on Coffins Patch and elsewhere diving the wrecks of the 1733 Fleet. His dive shop in the Florida Keys is a mini-museum devoted to shipwrecks and sunken treasure.

One might be lucky enough to pull out a rare and valuable coin such as a fully dated Pillar Dollar. You never know what you are going to get! Since the Spanish conducted a remarkably thorough salvage of the 1733 Fleet and because the wrecks remained comparatively intact following the disaster, (in sharp contrast to the shipwrecks of the 1715 Fleet) coins from the 1733 Fleet much scarcer and command a premium. This "pickle jar" pull is a 4-real silver cob coin.

It comes with a Certificate of Authenticity. The item "1733 SPANISH FLEET SHIPWRECK 4 Reales Silver Cob Coin Sunken Treasure with COA" is in sale since Friday, August 10, 2018. This item is in the category "Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ World\North & Central America\Mexico\Colonial (up to 1821)". The seller is "bellebrady_12" and is located in New Iberia, Louisiana. This item can be shipped to United States.


1733 SPANISH FLEET SHIPWRECK 4 Reales Silver Cob Coin Sunken Treasure with COA